Fortune Apple falls on the head of Proview— Proview Shenzhen sees a new way to get out of its debt

By Evelyn Li Apple’s successful marketing on its product “iPad” may be facing a big loss in China when a court in China rejected its claim on ownership of the iPad trademark in the country. The court ruled for its rival Proview Technology (Shenzhen) Company Ltd. (Proview Shenzhen), a struggling company that registered trademarks for the name IPAD in mainland China long before Apple conceived its smash hit tablet computer. Following the court’s decision, Proview Shenzhen has sought to halt sales of Apple’s iPad in two Chinese cities. A court in Shanghai refused its request on preliminary injunction on “all sales of ‘iPad’ by Apple Computer Trading (Shanghai) Company Ltd.” due to “the uncertainty of the decision which will be made by the High People’s Court of Guangdong on trademark ownership over ‘iPad’.” Although Apple was able to stop the preliminary injunction, the appeal to the High People’s Court of Guangdong does not look optimistic. One big problem for Apple

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Supreme Court Finds NFL Not Single Entity for Purposes of Antitrust Analysis of IP Licensing

In American Needle Inc., v. National Football League et al., 2010 U.S. LEXIS 4166, 94 U.S.P.Q.2D 1673 (2010), the appellee American Needle Inc. (Needle) sued defendants including the National Football League (NFL), the NFLP, and Reebok for violations of §1 and 2 of the Sherman Act.  Between 1963 and 2000, the NFLP granted nonexclusive licenses to various vendors including Needle.  In 2000, the teams authorized the NFLP to grant exclusive licenses.  The NFLP granted a 10 year exclusive license to Reebok, and declined to renew Needle’s nonexclusive license. The district court and the court of appeals believed the main issue in the case was “whether with regard to the facet of their operations respecting exploitation of intellectual property rights, the NFL and its 32 teams are, in the jargon of antitrust law, acting as a single entity.” American Needle Inc. v. New Orleans LA. Saints, 496 F. Supp. 2d 941, 943 (2007).  Both the district court and the court of

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