Federal Circuit En Banc Decision Confirms Written Description is Separate from Enablement

In Ariad Pharmaceuticals, Inc., et a. v. Eli Lilly and Co., 598 F3d 1336, 94 USPQ2d 1161 (Fed. Cir. 2010) (en banc), the Federal Circuit reversed the district court’s denial of a JMOL and held that the asserted claims of U.S. Patent No. 6,410,516 are invalid as failing to meet the statutory written description requirement.   As background, the plaintiffs (herein, collectively referred to as “Ariad”) are the owners of U.S. Patent 6,410,516 (“the ’516 patent”). The patented technology relates to a method of reducing the activity of NF-κB, a transcription factor, in eukaryotic cells. Briefly, NF-κB is a substance that normally exists in cells as an inactive complex with a protein inhibitor, IκB. When a cell encounters extracellular stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharides from a bacterial invader, NF-κB is released from its inhibitor and travels to the cell nucleus, where it binds to NF-κB recognition sites to crank up the production of cytokines that stimulate the immune system to fight the

read more Federal Circuit En Banc Decision Confirms Written Description is Separate from Enablement

Feature Comment: The Heightened Disclosure Requirement for Software Claimed Using Means-Plus-Function Limitations

By Gregory L. Clinton[1] I.        INTRODUCTION The question of whether a computer component discloses adequate structure for a corresponding means-plus-function claim limitation has been a recurrent issue in recent Federal Circuit jurisprudence, most recently in the cases of Blackboard Inc. v. Desire2Learn Inc., 91 U.S.P.Q.2d 1481, 1483 (Fed. Cir. 2008).  and Net MoneyIN Inc. v. VeriSign Inc., 88 U.S.P.Q.2d 1751 (Fed. Cir. 2008).    In both cases the specification of the patents at issue did not provide adequate support for means-plus-function limitations in the claims.  Although the use of means-plus-function claims has fallen out of favor in recent years, means-plus-function claims remain useful in some situations.  Accordingly, a brief discussion on what to include in a specification to ensure proper support for such claims may be helpful to avoid problems during prosecution or litigation II.       ENABLEMENT OF SOFTWARE MEANS-PLUS-FUNCTION CLAIMS Both of the two cases previously mentioned, Blackboard and Net MoneyIN, revolved in part around whether the specification provided adequate support

read more Feature Comment: The Heightened Disclosure Requirement for Software Claimed Using Means-Plus-Function Limitations

Federal Circuit Holds Standard for Claim Interpretation for Purpose of Interference Is Distinct For Claim Interpretation for Purposes of 35 U.S.C. §§102 & 112

In Agilent Tech., Inc. v. Affymetrix, Inc., Civ. Case No. 2008-1466 (Fed. Cir. June 4, 2009), Agilent owns Schembri patent 6,513,968 (“Schembri”) issued on February 4, 2003 and claimed priority to an application filed August 21, 1998.  Affymetrix believed it had earlier invented the claimed methods of the Schembri patent and copied the claims of the Schembri patent into its Besemer patent application 10/619,244 (“Besemer”) to provoke an interference.  The Besemer application claimed priority through a string of continuations to a patent application filed June 7, 1995, which made Affymetrix the senior party to the interference under 37 C.F.R 2.96. The disputed claims in the Besemer application and the Schembri patent deal with “microarray hybridization,” which is a technique for performing multiple genetic analyses on a small fluid sample.  Specifically, claim 20 of the Schembri patent and claim 66 of the Besemer application relate to a method for mixing a fluid sample during hybridization, by providing and moving a bubble

read more Federal Circuit Holds Standard for Claim Interpretation for Purpose of Interference Is Distinct For Claim Interpretation for Purposes of 35 U.S.C. §§102 & 112