Feature Comment: The Impact of Uniloc USA, Inc. v. Microsoft Corp. on Patent Damages under 28 U.S.C. §1498(a)

By James G. McEwen[1] While many of the aspects of infringement claims against the Government have seemingly similar elements to actions against private parties under 35 U.S.C. §271, it is important to understand that 28 U.S.C. §1498(a) is not an exact counterpart to 35 U.S.C. §271.  For instance, 28 U.S.C. §1498(a) does not allow for actions against the Government for inducement and contributory infringement, or infringement through infringement of product by process claims.[2]  At the same time, the Government is directly liable for infringement by its contractors if the Government has authorized and consented to such uses of the patented invention, which outside of claims of inducement, contribution, or vicarious liability, does not exist in private party litigation under 35 U.S.C. §271.  The requirement for such authorization and consent claims is to ensure that the Government is able to secure contractor-provided goods and services by extending its immunity to contractors and thereby ensure that the contractors cannot be enjoined.[3] This

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Court of Federal Claims Indicates Contractor Liable Where Government is Immune

Federal Claims Allows Transfer To Allow Patent Infringement Suit Against Contractor Where Government Immune from Infringement In Zoltek Corp. v. United States, No. 96-166 C (Fed.Cl. Jan. 23, 2009), Zoltek Corporation owns Patent No. Re. 34,162 (“the ‘162 patent).  Originally, Zoltek asserted the ‘162 patent against the Federal Government under 28 U.S.C. § 1498(a).  28 U.S.C. §1498(a) sets forth a remedy for patentees whose patents are “used or manufactured” by government contractors acting with the “authorization or consent” of the Government. Zoltek has alleged that the Government caused the manufacture of carbon fiber products according to processes covered by the ‘162 patent and that these products were incorporated into Lockheed Martin Corporation’s F-22 Fighter Planes.  In 2001, the Government moved for partial summary judgment, raising 28 U.S.C. § 1498(c) as an affirmative defense to liability under 28 U.S.C. § 1498(a).  Specifically, the Government asserted that 28 U.S.C. §1498(c) provides that “[t]he provisions of this section shall not apply to any

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