Fair Use Doctrine

By Michael Small   The Copyright Office defines Copyright as the exclusive right for a person (mainly the author) to reproduce, publish, sell, or claim ownership of his or her original works of creation under Section 106 of the Copyright Act of 1976.[1]  The copyright symbol (©) identifies the work as protected to the copyright owner and the audience.  This intellectual property right grants protection to the author’s creative works such as literature, music, drama, arts, or architecture upon the creation of his or her product in a fixed media.  This protection remains valid until the owner’s death plus 70 years.  Afterwards, the work becomes public domain, which allows for anyone to use the work for any purpose.  However, to prevent potential conflict with the First Amendment’s grant of freedom of speech, religion, and the press, the court created the fair use doctrine as a check and balance to copyright’s power. The Fair Use Doctrine is a declaration that allows

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